Tag: curriculum (Page 2 of 2)

8 Pillars of Personalized Instruction

This post is part of a mini-series introduction to Individual Differences in Instruction and Storytelling. I lay the groundwork for deeper adventures in Differentiated Instruction, Learning Styles, Personalized Stories, and the like.

Check out the rest of the series.

Along the road of Individual Differences, we’ve talked about Differentiated Instruction, Multiple Intelligences, Learning Styles and Profiles, and Learner Assessments. Now, its time to sum up all this foundational theory into the pillars of personalized instruction. After this we can finally talk practicality in the classroom and in stories.

Excerpts from Laura Robb’s Differentiating Reading Instruction can be found on Scholastic Press’s teacher resources article “What is Differentiated Instruction.” In it, Laura discusses some key principles for differentiated instruction in reading that can be applied to personalized instruction in virtually any form. I have added a few more broad concepts into these 8 Pillars. These are concepts only, not specific implementations And, honestly, most of these are review of what we’ve already discussed.

Laura’s Key Principles

These are quoted directly:

  1. Ongoing, formative assessment: Teachers continually assess to identify students”™ strengths and areas of need so they can meet students where they are and help them move forward.
  2.  Recognition of diverse learners: The students we teach have diverse levels of expertise and experience with reading, writing, thinking, problem solving, and speaking. Ongoing assessments enable teachers to develop differentiated lessons that meet every students”™ needs.
  3. Group Work: Students collaborate in pairs and small groups whose membership changes as needed. Learning in groups enables students to engage in meaningful discussions and to observe and learn from one another.
  4. Problem Solving: The focus in classrooms that differentiate instruction is on issues and concepts rather than “the book” or the chapter. This encourages all students to explore big ideas and expand their understanding of key concepts.
  5. Choice: Teachers offer students choice in their reading and writing experiences and in the tasks and projects they complete. By negotiating with students, teachers can create motivating assignments that meet students”™ diverse needs and varied interests.

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Learning Profiles

This post is part of a mini-series introduction to Individual Differences in Instruction and Storytelling. I lay the groundwork for deeper adventures in Differentiated Instruction, Learning Styles, Personalized Stories, and the like.

Check out the rest of the series.

Be warned, this post is a little on the long side. I considered splitting it in two, but there was no good place to cut it.

We’ve talked about Learn Styles and Multiple Intelligences; basically coming to the conclusion that (duh) every person processes information differently. There are Linguistic, Mathmatical, Musical, Kinesthetic, Interpersonal, Intrapersonal, Naturalistic, and Spatial, among many others. The intelligences factor into a student’s (any student’s) Learning Style and shows us the best way to present information to that particular student.

This is very important, and we will talk more about how to do this as time goes on. But, a student’s Learning Style is only part of the equation. We are all more than brains seeking information to swallow. Humans are complex, social, broken, distractable, creative, and unique creatures. No two are alike. All of these other factors (along side Learning Styles) form a student’s Learning Profile. What follows is a somewhat incomplete list of other factors to account for when developing a student’s learning profile. In the next series post, we will combine all these together to create an index Learning Strategy for a particular student.

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Fellow Revolutionaries in Transformational Storytelling

My research centers around transformational storytelling, multimodal, interactive storytelling, and (to a large degree), differentiated instruction . I advocate using new technology as one means of telling these life-altering stories. It all basically comes down to

How can we tell engaging stories that teach, heal, and transform lives?

That’s a pretty simple, pretty powerful concept. And, like all things simple and powerful, it is shared by many others. Educators, scholars, artists, pastors, counselors, and many others are tackling the ideas of digital and transformational storytelling. This is a revolution — a revolution worth joining.

To that end, I wanted to start a conversation in hopes of bringing some of these revolutionaries together. These are a few of the individuals and groups who have inspired me by tackling difficult challenges in innovative ways. This is not a complete list, and it isn’t meant to be. Nor does this list include many of the scholars on whom I draw for theoretical foundations. I will post about the giants upon whose shoulders I stand another time.

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Multiple Intelligence and Learning Styles

This post is part of a mini-series introduction to Individual Differences in Instruction and Storytelling. I lay the groundwork for deeper adventures in Differentiated Instruction, Learning Styles, Personalized Stories, and the like.

Check out the rest of the series.

The next stop on our journey through core concepts of Individual Differences in Education and Storytelling is an introduction to theories of intelligence, multiple intelligence, and learning styles.

For our purposes, we will build on a simplified version of Jean Piaget’s concept of Assimilation and Accommodation. In essence, Piaget noted that when individuals encounter and process new information, they must square that information with pre-existing information in their schema (stuff they already know). They can either adapt the incoming information or adapt what they know to absorb the new information.

A basic example:

A child sees a green firetruck. They know (their schema dictates) that fire trucks are red. This firetruck is green. Faced with this new, contradicting information, the child may assimilate the information by adapting the incoming knowledge. “This is a new kind of firetruck that is green. It is different than red firetrucks.”

Or the child can accommodate the information by changing what he/she already knows. “Firetrucks can be green or red.”

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Differentiated Instruction

This post is part of a mini-series introduction to Individual Differences in Instruction and Storytelling. I lay the groundwork for deeper adventures in Differentiated Instruction, Learning Styles, Personalized Stories, and the like.

Check out the rest of the series.

 

As I am hard at work adapting my master’s thesis for the series Basics of Educational Stories, I thought it would be a good idea to lay some groundwork in the area of education. One of the most exciting concepts in education today is differentiated instruction (DI). It may sound technical and scholarly, but it’s really very simple. Every person learns differently, processes information in a unique way, and has diverse strengths. DI is just a set of methods that run with this common sense idea. Instead of pounding knowledge into the student’s brain, DI teachers create an atmosphere where students of all ages encounter the material in a unique way.

This is imperative when discussing transformational stories because each audience member has a unique way of perceiving the world and specific  lenses everything is interpreted through. We will look at all this much closer in future posts, but for now, here is a great introduction from glencoe.com:

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