Tag: critique groups

Writers’ Groups

Writers groups, or critique circles, are pivotal in becoming a professional writer. Thriller writer Nicole Wilson shares her thoughts on the importance of these groups, what makes a good group, and how to get the most out of the experience.


One of the most important steps a writer can take to help their craft is to join a writers’ group. It’s literally a collection of people who are experiencing the same struggle you are, and it can be incredibly encouraging.

How They Work

A small group of people meet at a predefined location, usually a bookstore or someone’s house. Everyone is a writer, so it’s a safe zone to express your successes, frustrations, and everything in between. Also, each person is at a different stage in their writing. Some are already published, others are agenting, and others are working on their first manuscript. Normally, there’s a set page limit, so all of you bring, say, ten pages a week every Thursday night at 7 PM. Each person either reads their piece aloud or has it read aloud by someone else in the group. Then the group takes a few minutes (some are stricter and time it) to discuss any big-ticket items.

My Experiences

I’ve been lucky enough to be a part of two great writers’ groups in my writing career. A friend – who later became my husband – invited me to tag along to his group. The first time I went, I had no clue what to expect. We were meeting at a Barnes & Noble, and, when I walked in, there was this small table toward the back where eight or nine people were sitting. I found Michael and was immediately welcomed with open arms in the group. I made several friends that, three years later, I still keep in touch with. As for the structure, each person picked someone else to read their five pages. We went around the circle and gave short feedback. The author was not aloud to speak until the feedback was complete.

The second writers’ group I’ve loved (which I’m currently in now) is also amazing. We meet at one woman’s house and sit around her dining room table. Everyone reads their own ten pages out loud, then whoever has a comment speaks and the group discusses. The author is allowed to comment with the group. It’s a loving community of 8-13 people (depending on the week), and we share food and life as well.

Benefits

There are many benefits to joining a writers’ group.
1) Simply put, you have access to a support group. These people either know what it’s like to go through what you are now or they want to know, so they encourage sharing stories, both successes and failures.

Read the rest…


Nicole Wilson spends her days planning for disasters and her nights writing about them. She lives in a small apartment with her husband and two cats, all who contribute to her writing endeavors. Nicole has written many books and short stories and is at work on more. Three of the short stories have been published online, which you can find on her website at www.nicolewilsonauthor.com

Finding (A Writing) Community

Nicole Wilson, a thriller author, has written about the importance of writer’s groups several times. Here is a fantastic post about getting involved in writing communities.

We, as a people, are social creatures. That’s how we’re built. Sure, there are personality differences that change the level of interaction needed or desired, but we still need others. Especially when your chosen craft is as solitary as writing is. It’s a lonely sport. We sit alone at home (or in a coffee shop), we outline (maybe), we write, we revise, and we edit. All of that, for the most part, is a solitary activity.

It’s also a difficult path to pursue as a hobby or career. There isn’t a guarantee of money or fame, but those are the goals a lot of us work toward. In the wake of the loneliness, these also bring heartache, discouragement, and pain. Between the length of time it takes to finish a project (start to finish, it took me 16 months to finish Deception) and the rejection letters from agents and the poor sales numbers on self-publishing sites, the heart can only take so much.

This is why community is so important. While the craft itself is fairly solitary, there are opportunities to interact with other writers. It’s important to find others to help you grow, encourage you, and to help you persevere during the inevitable lows. And there are so many existing places to connect! They can be in person or online, and most of them are free!

Some examples include writing groups (also called critique groups or critique circles), online communities, and social media. They can provide you with encouragement, answers your questions, help you make other connections, critique your work, and suggest ways for you to grow. And the best part: they’re writers just like you! They know the struggle of sifting through rejection letters. It’s not an empty “I’m sorry” but a heartfelt “I’ve been there and you’ll make it through.” (Not that those who aren’t writers can’t offer support and encouragement. It’s just different.) They have the same goals as you, so they understand when you text “can’t talk – in a writing streak”.

Read the rest…


Nicole Wilson spends her days planning for disasters and her nights writing about them. She lives in a small apartment with her husband and two cats, all who contribute to her writing endeavors. Nicole has written many books and short stories and is at work on more. Three of the short stories have been published online, which you can find on her website at www.nicolewilsonauthor.com.

 


 

Secrets of the Writer’s Circle

Last week, we talked about critique groups. This week, I wanted to share some keys to creating an effective critique group. Let me paint a picture of what I mean when I say “writer’s circle”: A group of upwards to 10 (more than that gets difficult) that meet regularly (weekly or twice a month at least) to read aloud and critique each other’s work. They write as much feedback as they can, and then take turns giving oral feedback where appropriate. Afterwards, they may stay and chat about other writer-related topics. The group is for serious writers who want to publish (traditionally or self-publish), and (hopefully) open to all skill levels.

Giving credit where credit is due, a lot of this comes from my writer’s guild: The Houston Writer’s Guild.

Trust and Encouragement

Any good writer’s circle must be a place where everyone trusts the other members. This is difficult. There is always that one person who seems to know everything and bleed others dry.

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A Circle of Word Smiths (Critique Groups)

No man is an island. No writer writes alone. Sure, most of our work exists inside our own minds and all that time at the keyboard is a solitary duty. Even more, we edit and cut and revise so that only we really know what’s happening in the story. We hold all the pieces; alone. And if your writing is thereputic, or for you, then that is as far as it need go. Enjoy your time. Covet the story. Hold it tight and embrace the solitude.

However, if you write for others — to entertain, to teach, to share, to get paid, then you can only go so far by yourself. If there is one thing all agents and editors agree on, its that you must have a strong critique group. Not just friends and family. Not only the students in your class. Peers can help you find things in your writing that will make it better. You want readers to read your work, may as well start now 😉

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